Sunday Summary – March 26, 2017

sundaybanner

 

This week in writing

writingthumb

This week felt so much better after having a week’s rest. I’m back to working on With Memories and Magic, and I’m feeling it again! I did an extra writing session today, for a total weekly word count of 3227, which is my highest weekly total since mid-February. I’m hoping to reach 50k by the end of March!

this week in reading

readingthumb

I’m still going with  A Conjuring of Light by V. E. Schwab. It’s enjoyable when I’m reading it, but I’m not itching to pick it up again whenever I’m not.  I’ve also started He Said/She Said by Erin Kelly, which I won in a GoodReads giveaway. I wanted to read something in hard copy during my study breaks today, as taking a break from the computer to read ACOL on the tablet seemed counter-productive. I’m not far enough into it yet to really have an opinion.

This week in blogging

blogginthumb

While I responded to comments on this blog, that’s about all I managed this week. I had study commitments taking up most of my time, meaning visitng other people’s  blogs barely even occurred to me. This coming week will have to be a “do better” week. Since I haven’t been finishing any books, any reviews are delayed, too. Boo.

THIS WEEK IN STUDY

Today I finished the Linguistics paper I have due on Tuesday. For a while I thought it was going to be an “Ahh, I don’t have enough to say!”- type paper, but then I ended up meeting the word limit without too much trouble. I need to start thinking about my two big assignments soon, as time will start getting away from me and I won’t have anything planned.

This week in health and fitness

fitnessthumb

This week has been “get my shit back together” week. For the most part, I ate better (there were a couple of not-so-great days) and on Thursday I started the Beginners calendar from a blog I just discovered, Blogilates, hosted by Cassey Ho. I’m going to try doing the four week program without any additional exercise and see how I look/feel at the end. I also plan on weighing in for the first time in a while on April 1, so stay tuned next week for that result.

Highlights this week

Despite neither of being huge fans of stand-up comedy, my partner and I decided to go along to a couple of Canberra Comedy Festival shows this weekend. The first one we saw was called Women Can’t Take a Joke, and it was an all-women lineup. There were some acts we liked better than others, but overall it was fun. Last night, we went along to the Clean Comedy Spectacular, which was actually more our thing, since things like dick jokes and swearing don’t really appeal.

That’s me for this week. How have you all been doing? ~ Emily

Save

Save


Find me on:
GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

#WWW and #WIPpet Wednesday – 22 March, 2017

wednesdaybanner

Welcome to WIPpet Wednesday! This is a weekly blog hop hosted by yours truly. If you’re a writer, you are very welcome to join us by posting an excerpt from your WIP that somehow relates to the date. You can click the blue guy on the right of this blog to be taken to the link up.

While I’m back to working on With Memories and Magic, I thought I would continue sharing from my Wizard of Oz retelling for the rest of March. In this scene, Dora is talking to Julia Lyons, a fellow actress, about auditions and particularly the one she has coming up. I’ve added 2+2+3 for seven paragraphs.

“That’s the spirit! Hey, maybe you could come along to this one I’m going for next week.”

“What is it?”

Dora fished in her handbag and pulled out a battered library book. It was called A Hero’s Mission and the cover showed a half-naked man wielding a sword.

Julia raised her eyebrows. “It’s looks terrible,” she said frankly.

“It’s… pretty terrible, yeah,” Dora agreed. “But there’s this princess that he rescues at the start, and that’s the role I’m going for. It’s being directed by Oliver Zamik -”

“Oliver Zamik who directed A Pirate Tale? Dora, this will be terrible!”

“I know! His movies are always awful. But think about it. A small role in a crap but popular fantasy movie could be my big break!”

And that’s why I’ll stick to community theatre and never bother trying it professionally. 😛

And now it’s time for WWW Wednesday! This blog hop is hosted by Sam over at A World Of Words. Link up with us by commenting on Sam’s post for this week, and just answer the three questions.

wwwwednesday

What have you recently finished reading?

Nothing finished this week, but I did DNF Adverbs by Daniel Handler. It’s not that it was bad, just one of those cases where I wasn’t really digging it and I had other books that I wanted to get to. In another time and place, I may well have read it right through.

My reviews of A Tangle of Gold (Colours of Madeleine #3) by Jaclyn Moriarty and  So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson went up this week. Click the titles to read them.

What are you currently reading?

Currently reading A Conjuring Of Light by V. E. Schwab. I think this is definitely back up to the standard of the first book (I found the second one incredibly dull and it took me forever to read). Having said that, I was thinking about this series as a whole yesterday and I don’t think I’ve loved it overall as much as others have, but I am glad that I’m seeing it through. It is nice to actually tick a complete series of my TBR.

What do you think you’ll read next?

A colleague leant me the first four books of the Parasol Protectorate series ages ago, so I want to start Soulless and finally see if I like it or not. I’m generally not the biggest fan of vampires, werewolves, etc, but I understand this is quite a witty series and I am a fan of that. So we’ll see.

What are you reading this week? 🙂

~ Emily

“The snowflake never needs to feel responsible for the avalanche” // Review of “So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed” by Jon Ronson

Title: So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed
Author: Jon Ronson
Genre: Non-fiction
Audio book narrator: John Ronson
Date Read: 12/03/2017 – 16/03/2017
Rating: ★★★

Review:

Anyone who has spent more than five minutes on Twitter has probably witnessed a public shaming – when someone posts something poorly worded and the entire Internet sancitmoniously piles in on them. This is the behaviour Jon Ronson explores in this book, and the devastating effects the shaming can have on the person who is at the heart of the scandal.

Ronson focuses on four main case studies, three fo which I recognised, as well as presenting a more general history of public shaming as well as research about the psychology of the crowd mentality and how this pertained to other issues relating to shame as well.

While the content was interesting, I did feel it often went off-topic, and that it wasn’t structured in the best way. Sometimes I wondered exactly what the story Ronson was telling now had to do with the example he been talking about moment before. There were times when he would introduce one of the case studies he used, then go off talking about the Standford Prison Experiment.

Still, it definitely was interesting, and got me thinking. It also made me rather relieved that all I talk about on the Internet, really, is books, and that I usually delete any tweets I tend to start writing about “controversial” topics before I post them. I would recommend this one for anyone with an interest in psychology or sociology, as it is a good starting exploration of these issues unique to the Internet age.


Find me on:
GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Sunday Summary – March 19, 2017

sundaybanner

 

This week in writing

writingthumb

This was one of those weeks where I could either do work at work, or I could do work such as writing at home. And there was also some uni work thrown in there. I was just not going to manage both. Obviously, I have no choice about those two things, so writing had to be put on the backburner. Honestly, I think it was a good thing. While I haven’t quite written all the scenes that are in my head for my contemporary Wizard of Oz retelling, I’ve returned to With Memories and Magic and I’m feeling really motivated, which is a sign the break I’ve taken was exactly what I needed. I met with some writing friends today and wrote 1000 words on it, and it was in a scene that was causing me trouble before I took the break. so that’s a sign it was exactly what I needed.

this week in reading

readingthumb

In the couple of weeks since my last Sunday Summary, I’ve polished off a whole heap of books. Even with some disctractions, I still feel I’m doing reasonably well on my March TBR. Yesterday I finally started A Conjuring of Light by V. E. Schwab, the third and final book in the Shades of Magic series. I’ve been a bit apprehensive because I was disappointed by the second book, but so far, so good!

This week in blogging

blogginthumb

While I am yet to visit the WIPpet Wednesday blogs for this week, it is still on my radar. I have it on my Habitica to do list for the week, which should mean it gets done either later tonight or tomorrow. I did, however, reply to all comments on my blog and receiprocate WWW Wednesday comments. I’ve also updated my 2017 Reading Challenges pages. I have a review scheduled for tomorrow but I’m not sure I’ll have finished reading anything in time for a review to be scheduled for Friday.

THIS WEEK IN STUDY

Here’s an ephiphany I had today: doing the assigned reading can help you understand the terminologies being discussed in class! What a surprise! I’m  shocked! Not really, of course, but I was reminded of it the hard way today, after angsting for a couple of weeks about not understanding a particular framework then realising there was a reading on it two weeks ago. I didn’t get quite as much done as I’d hoped today, given that I spent from 1pm to 8pm at the library, but I’ve given myself some good groundwork to continue with the next assignment, so I’m actually feeling pretty motivated and on track.

This week in health and fitness

fitnessthumb

I’m actually not going to address this topic at the moment. I’ve sort of fallen off the wagon, I guess, but I’ll be reassessing my goals on April 1 and then I’ll go from there.

.

Highlights this week

This week at work, staff received a talk from a very inspirational woman named Lucy Perry. While the title of the talk was Focus on Leadership, a lot of what she spoke about was women’s rights, and the work she has done with leading charitable non-profit organisations. I came out of it feeling incredibly inspired, and requested an info pack for the 2018 Trek for Rights event being run through Inspired Adventures in conjunction with UN Women. I have sent off an email with a few more questions, so there’s no firm commitment yet, but hey, in a few weeks, this section might be reading “OMG I’M GOING TO NEPAL, YOU GUYS!”

That’s me for this week. How have you all been doing? ~ Emily

Save

Save


Find me on:
GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

#aww2017 “I’m always watching around corners. I just keep watching for something special.” // Review of “A Tangle of Gold” by Jaclyn Moriarty

Title: A Tangle of Gold(Colours  of Madeleine #2)
Author: Jaclyn Moriarty
Genre: YA/urban fantasy
Date Read: 11/03/2017 – 14/03/2017
Rating: ★★

Review:

Agggh, writing this review is causing me a lot of angst. Over the few days between finishing the book and beginning this review, I have tried to work out what to rate it. When I first rated it on GoodReads, I gave it four stars, stating in the text of the review that it was 3.5 but I was going to round it up because I loved the first two books so much. But then I thought about it and decided it was really only a three-star read for me, because while it had a few good moments, I didn’t love it as much as the other two. The next morning I was still thinking about what had bothered me overall, and realised there was really only one moment that I really loved, and I wasn’t entirely sure that it outweighed the stuff that frustrated me. So here we are, with a 2.5 star rating for the final book, after two solid four-star reads.

Yikes, that was a rambling paragraph.

Anyway.

In my review of book two of this series, I said that one thing I appreciated was the fact that it didn’t give more of the same, but instead built on the first book and took all the concepts further. The same could be said of this book, except that it didn’t have the same effect this time.

One of the issues (probably the main issue) was that Kiera, a secondary character in the second book, became a principle character in this one and I Did. Not. Like. Her. She looked down her nose at everybody, including my favourite characters, and even when she sort of addressed this, I didn’t feel like she stopped, just that she managed to hide her snobbery a bit better. I started flipping forward to see how many more chapters I would have to read from her point-of-view before we returned to Madeleine or Elliot.

Speaking of Elliot, I didn’t like his character arc either. He made a lot of decisions that didn’t make a lot of sense to me. He was using huge leaps of logic to come to the conclusions he based his decisions on, and he always seemed smarter than that.

I can’t say too much about Madeleine without delving into huge spoiler territory, but I will say that the large twist regarding her and her mother that took place was a big enough game changer that it changed the way the story worked, and it just wasn’t the story/premise/situation I fell in love with after that (having said that, the twist itself was the aforementioned one moment I really loved). Elliot and Madeleine had no way of corresponding like they always used to, and that was one of my favourite aspects of the series.

Plot-wise, everything also got quite convoluted. The theories behind the cracks between Cello and the World got very confusing and then there were secret organisations that kind of came out of nowhere playing their parts, and everything go tied up a bit too nicely at the end. I closed the book feeling unsatisfied, and there is little worse than that, particularly when it’s the conclusion of a series that started out so well.


(This review is part of the Australian Women Writers Challenge 2017. Click here for more information).

Find me on:
GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

#WWW and #WIPpet Wednesday – 15 March, 2017

wednesdaybanner

Welcome to WIPpet Wednesday! This is a weekly blog hop hosted by yours truly. If you’re a writer, you are very welcome to join us by posting an excerpt from your WIP that somehow relates to the date. You can click the blue guy on the right of this blog to be taken to the link up.

I was away over part of last week and briefly returned to With Memories and Magic but my main project at the moment is still my Wizard of Oz contemporary retelling. Today I’m sharing 15 lines for the 15th day of the month. Dora is chatting to one of her housemates, Sam Crowe, who if you couldn’t tell from the name, is the Scarecrow character. He’s only just started college and he’s already flunking out.

“I barely passed this paper,” he said. “If I don’t pick up my grades soon, I’m going to flunk this class.”

“What’s the class?”

“Twentieth century American literature.”

Dora stopped leaning on the door frame and took a seat on the couch next to him. “I did a few literature courses while I was getting my drama degree,” she said. “I did pretty well. Maybe I could take a look at it for you. I might be able to give you some advice.”

Sam didn’t look too thrilled at the suggestion, but he shrugged and handed the paper to Dora anyway. The topic of the paper was broad, asking for a discussion of themes in Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. As Dora glanced over it, she began to see a few reasons for Sam’s lower marks. He didn’t really focus on a particular topic; instead he jumped from idea to idea. His examples were vague, too. She had a feeling he had only read parts of the book and was trying to shoehorn in the quotes he was familiar with, even if they didn’t quite fit the point he was trying to make.

“Listen, I’m not trying to be rude,” Dora said, “but did you actually read the book?”

“Yes,” Sam replied, too quickly. Dora just raised her eyebrows at him and he looked away, shrugging again. “Maybe half of it. I used CliffsNotes for the rest.”

Dora bit her lip, trying not to laugh. “Sam, do you really think CliffsNotes is going to get you through college?”

And now it’s time for WWW Wednesday! This blog hop is hosted by Sam over at A World Of Words. Link up with us by commenting on Sam’s post for this week, and just answer the three questions.

wwwwednesday
So I had the majority of this post ready for last week, then I shut down my computer and went away for three days without finishing it and posting it, so here we are! As a result, and the fact that I had lots of reading time while I was away, this is sligthly longer than usual.

What have you recently finished reading?

These aren’t in order of when I read them, rather I’ve grouped like books together.


I have finished the entire Colours of Madeleine series by Jaclyn Moriarty, comprising of A Corner of White (which I listened to on audio and the narrators were completely awesome), the Cracks in the Kingdom and A Tangle of Gold (I read these two in paperback). The first two I absolutely loved, but I was let down by the third one sadly. My reviews of A Corner of White and Cracks in the Kingdom are here and here respectively. A Tangle of Gold’s review goes up on Friday.

On a related note, I was thinking about starting a “this series started so well, what happened?” shelf on GoodReads because this happens to me an awful lot! Or maybe I need to swear off series and concentrate on standalone books.

untoldcoverI also finished Untold, the second book in the Lynburn Legacy series by Sarah Rees Brennan. The character arcs and the writing were really well done but the plot itself was a bit light on the ground. Review here.

I also finally got back to the Lemony Snicket books and read The Wide Window and The Miserable Mill, books three and four of A Series of Unfortuate Events. I haven’t been reviewing these because they work to a particular formula and I don’t think I would have enough to say about each of them individually, but they are rather addictive! Though I seem to be liking the odd-numbered books better than the even-numbered ones, so that’s a thing.

And last but not least, I’m going to put this here because I’m going to finish this tonight, So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson on audio. This is an interesting book exploring the issue of public shaming in the age of the Internet, and how a person can have the virtual screaming hoards pile onto them and they can lose their jobs, etc, over one badly worded tweet. It’s fascinating stuff, though I think some of the things he talks about are a bit tangential, or at least the way he structures the book makes them seem that way.

I also posted my review of The Fearless Travelers’ Guide to Wicked Places by Peter Begler since my last post.

What are you currently reading?

After weeks of having this book as the answer to What do you think you’ll read next, I am finally actually reading Adverbs by Daniel Handler. It’s essentially a short story anthology, but the stories are all set in the same universe, and the main characters in some stories show up later in smaller roles in others. It’s interesting, but the writing style is a bit pretentious, but then I guess even his Lemony Snicket books are a bit pretentious.

 

What do you think you’ll read next?

So I thought my March TBR had gone right out the window, but I’m actually not doing too terribly with it, despite getting distracted by Jaclyn Moriarty. A Conjuring Of Light by V. E. Schwab is still waiting for me on Kindle, so that will probably be next. After that, I’m looking forward to returning to my Beat the Backlist and Australian Women Writers Challenge items for a while.

What are you reading this week? 🙂

~ Emily

#AWW2017 “How about we meet at midnight tomorrow and try this. I close my eyes, believe in you, and there you’ll be.” // Review of “The Cracks in the Kingdom” by Jaclyn Moriarty

Title: The Cracks in the Kingdom (Colours  of Madeleine #2)
Author: Jaclyn Moriarty
Genre: YA/urban fantasy
Date Read: 06/03/2017 – 11/03/2017
Rating: ★★★★

Review:

(If you haven’t read my review for the first book in this series, A Corner of White, you can do so here.)

My instinct when I finished this book was to give it five stars, but on reflection I decided it was more of a four. I’ve said in previous reviews that my star ratings are often based on  a vibe rather than any objective ratings system, and that’s the case with this one. I actually had to make myself stop reading the third one and write this review because I was so intent on staying with these characters, but knew I’d forget details if I didn’t stop now.

I won’t go into the plot too much because I don’t want to spoil anything for the previous book. The plot picks up where the first one left off, but rather than giving us more of the same, which is often what happens with middle books, this one builds on what came before.

It did seem that Jaclyn Moriarty clearly delighted in teasing me with numerous moments of Elliot and Madeleine nearly meeting through the crack between their worlds.  And those moments brought them even closer together, relationship-wise. Their relationship isn’t romantic, at least not really (it has the potential to go that way), but they’ve got such a deep bond, even though they sometimes disagree and argue and sometimes their friendship gets messy and difficult. I haven’t been this invested in two characters in a long time. I have so many feelings!

The other great thing with this book is that we got to see the other provinces of the Kingdom of Cello, via Elliot’s meetings with Princess Ko and the other members of the Royal Youth Alliance. Jagged Edge is full of interesting technology while Olde Quainte is… well, old and quaint. And hilarious. It’s a serious breach of ettitquette in this province to not have a simile in at least every third sentence you speak, though it doesn’t matter if the simile doesn’t make any sense. I also really enjoyed the descriptions of the Magical North, where magic interferes with technology, but where the Royal Family makes its home.

As with the first book, the action really ramped up in the last third. There were a few times where I was torn between stopping to make an “OMG!” status update on GoodReads and continuing to read. Continuing to read kept winning out and in the end, I only made one update for the entire book (which is unusual; normally I like to squee a lot when I’m enjoying a book, so that shows you how hooked I was).

I think I will leave this here before I get even more gushy and decide that actually yes, I should be rating this five stars (I think I figured out while writing this review that the main reason it’s only four is because Madeleine doesn’t really do a lot for herself, not anything that’s plot related anyway, and mostly just does what she’s told re: the Royal Family). And I’m going to go keep reading the next book in the series and spend more time with these characters.


(This review is part of the Australian Women Writers Challenge 2017. Click here for more information).

Find me on:
GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

“If the truth didn’t help anyone, and love didn’t last, what was there left to struggle toward?” // Review of “Untold” by Sarah Rees Brennan

Title: Untold (The Lynburn Legacy #2)
Author: Sarah Rees Brennan
Genre:
YA/urban fantasy
Date Read: 28/02/2017 – 06/03/2017
Rating: ★★★

Review: 

This was a strong sequel to Unspoken, with beautiful writing again and some strong character arcs, but the plot itself was a bit dull. I realised 200 pages in that I couldn’t really tell you what had been happening.

Factions are forming in Sorry-in-the-Vale, with sorcerors and townspeople giving their support to either Rob Lynburn or Lillian. Jared is still mad at Kami and she is trying to work out whether she likes Jared, Ash or both of them. And they have until the Winter Solstice when Rob Lynburn will return the town to its old ways and demand a blood sacrifice.

Credit where credit is due, this is the first time I have read a YA love triangle that actually worked. I think it is because Jared nor Ash are both actually well-developed characters and we get to see scenes from their points-of-view, which avoids that issue in so much YA where the two romantic interests just come across as entitled jerks. Jared and Kami’s relationship returned to the deep messiness that I enjoyed so much in the first book, and I really appreciated how Ash tried to understand that but really just couldn’t appreciate the connection Jared and Kami shared.

The side characters are all really well written. Angela’s coming out story, which was touched on briefly in the first book, was addressed, and continued to be handled with nuance. The awkwardness between her and Holly felt really honest. The conflict between Kami’s parents when her father found about her mother’s involvement in magic also read really well, and both the situation itself and Kami’s feelings about it were very realistic.

As I said above, it was the plot that moved so slowly that lost this one points. I got to page 228, where Kami was once again doing research into the Lynburn records to try to find information that might help them against Rob Lynburn, and realised that with the exception of the opening chapter, there had been little action up until that point. It had all been about who it was that Kami made out with in a dark corridor at the pub, and Ash feeling inadequate about all facets of his life, and Angela and Kami making sure nothing was awkward between them. So while it was all beautifully written and the characterisation was great, it still got a little dull after a while.


Find me on:
GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

“I don’t know where to start. She’s critiquing your existence!” // Review of “A Corner of White” by Jaclyn Moriarty #aww2017

Title: A Corner of White (Colours  of Madeleine #1)
Author: Jaclyn Moriarty
Genre: YA/urban fantasy
Audio book narrator: Fiona Hardingham, Andrew Eiden, Kate Reinders, Peter McGowan
Date Read: 21/02/2017 – 03/03/2017
Rating: ★★★★

Review:

Well, if this book isn’t completely charming. Very character-driven, and as such, probably not for everyone, but I was emotionally invested enough by the end that seeing evidence of character growth made me smile tearfully.

A Corner of White is set paritally in Cambridge, England, home of Madeleine Tully, and partially in the province of The Farms in the Kingdom of Cello. In the past, people used to  travel between the two places via “cracks”, though these have since been closed. The World has forgotten about Cello, and the penalty for not reporting a crack in Cello is death. But when Madeleine Tully pulls a letter out of a parking metre in Cambridge and begins a correspondence with Elliot Buranski, they become each other’s confidant as they attempt to navigate teenage life and love, and try to understand why the people they love aren’t around any more.

Madeleine is a tricky character to understand. A lot of the time, the Madeleine that came across in her letters to Elliot felt quite separate from the Madeleine that we saw through the eyes of her friends. It was sometimes  a bit hard to reconcile the two. However, she started to make more sense as the story went on. Madeleine doesn’t believe in the Kingdom of Cello for most of the story, instead thinking that her mysetery correspondent is a lonely, geeky boy world-building a novel. She critiques him on his world-building and gives him suggestions for how to make the writing stronger. While this is frustrating for Elliot, it did make the writing very self-aware and entertaining.

Elliot is a bit easier to get a grasp on. His father went missing a year before the beginning of the story, and while everyone in the twon suspects he ran off with the local physics teacher (who disappeared at the same time), Elliot is convinced that there’s something more nefarious at work. He just has no idea how close he is to the truth.

The world-building for Cambridge is quite straightforward, with Madeleine’s quirky friends and acquaintances adding colour to the scenes. It’s in Cello where things are different. While they still drive trucks or take trains and have TV and that sort of thing, they are also vulnerable to Colour attacks: strange weather phenomena that can affect their minds or outright attack them. Colours are graded depending on their ferocity. These took a little while to figure out at first, but there is enough description for you to get the idea, and then it’s easy to imagine the effects of differnt Colours. There is also Butterfly Child, a small fairy-like creature that Elliot catches but does not know how to befriend.

The writing is beautiflu and  lyrical. As I said, the story is quite character-driven (though the plot picks up in the last third maybe? And has left a lot of room  for further adventures in the next book) but I really enjoyed watching the relationships between various characters develop as they learned more about themselves and each other. I feel like this is one of those books where the story and writing are enhanced by the audio narrators, all four of them do a fantastic job (Fiona Hardingham and Andrew Eiden do the bulk of it, with the other two taking on smaller character roles). I am disappointed that my library’s Overdrive does not have the next two books in the series, but I have already obtained print copies, so I’m not going to complain too much.

I’m reading back over what I’ve written here and feel like I haven’t quite done this book justice. I do recommend it, though!


(This review is part of the Australian Women Writers Challenge 2017. Click here for more information).

Find me on:
GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Sunday Summary – March 05, 2017

sundaybanner

 

This week in writing

writingthumb

As stated in my previous Sunday Summary, this week I started work on my contemporary Wizard of Oz retelling, which was titled The Yellow Brick Roadhouse until I realised that a roadhouse was not the word I wanted (i.e. for a boarding house/hostel-type thing). So now I’m title-less and have to think of another pun. I’m still finding the right voice for it so I’ve only written 1952 words this week, but it’s getting there. I’m just writing scenes as they come to me, rather than trying to write in order with this one.

this week in reading

readingthumb

I finished the utterly charming A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty on audio this week. I have already got the next two books from the library (my library’s Overdrive didn’t have them, sadly) and I plan to start them as soon as I’ve finished Untold by Sarah Rees Brennan. This is a good sequel to Unspoken in some ways, but in others, it feels like barely anything is reallly happening. BTW. my March TBR has pretty much gone out the window. I don’t know why I even bothered writing one, really.

This week in blogging

blogginthumb

I got back on my game of visiting all the WIPpeteers within an hour on Friday night. This is something I need to keep up as we move further into the semester, as blogging time is going to be at a minimum over the next few months. I visited the WWW participants whom I follow and who commented on my post, but didn’t visit any additional ones. It’s about quality, not quantity, though, right? I’ve got my A Corner of White review scheduled for tomorrow and I’m hoping that I’ll have one for Untold scheduled for Friday.

THIS WEEK IN STUDY

studythumbWell, I’ve made a start! And I have a to do list. I spent about four hours at the library yesterday, but wifi was not on my side, and while I had a few things downloaded in advance, turned out it was not quite everything I needed. I also got up early this morning and finished the worksheet that is due tomorrow, so I’m feeling not too bad.

This week in health and fitness

fitnessthumb

As I mentioned last week, I’ve decided to start weighing myself on a Monday rather than a Sunday for various reasons, so I don’t have a figure for you today. But I’ve exceeded 10k steps every day this week, and reached my 5 day exercise goal. My eating habits were reasonably good but I didn’t log everything I ate every day (particularly Friday, when I had three pieces of brownie). Time will tell, thouugh, how this all balanced out, I guess!

Other Highlights This Week

highlightsthumbOn Friday I had a job interview for the position I’m acting in now (hence the three brownies). If I’m successful in this recruitment process, the position would then become my permanent one. I don’t think it could have gone much better! As far as I can tell, I gave strong answers and gave good examples for all the questions, and I managed not to ramble too much (and when I did ramble, I picked myself up on it, stopped and said, “Sorry, let me go back here.”). Hopefully that will get me high on the list of suitable candidates. The issue is not so much that I would be deemed unsuitable for this one, just that several of my colleagues also applied and are equally suitable. I don’t envy my managers having to make this decision.

That’s me for this week. How have you all been doing? ~ Emily

Save

Save


Find me on:
GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram